warm-up

Tag

The Warm-Up: Important For Improved Performance

Warming up is an important aspect of any practice or workout and it’s also one that is frequently misunderstood. This post will give you some thoughts about how to construct an effective warm-up.   The textbooks divide warm-ups into two phases; a general warm-up and a specific warm-up. For me this is a little constraining. I like to think that a good warm-up has three parts; a rhythmic movement, dynamic flexibility exercises, and event-specific movements.   Rhythmic movement A good...

Using Bands and Squats To Improve Sprinting Speed

sprint

The concept of post-activation potentiation (PAP) has been around for a long time under several names. The first few generations of Soviet coaches/sport scientists that came to the west called it complex training. The idea is to use some type of a brief, heavy strength training load to cue the nervous system (i.e. recruit a large number of muscle fibers). That recruitment is then used to enhance performance on a speed/power event. For example, heavy squats followed by a vertical...

Use Heavy Ropes For Your Warm Up

heavy rope training

  Heavy ropes (also known as battle ropes or training ropes) are essentially 60-200 foot long extra thick ropes.  This training tool involves the lower body, core, and upper body.  Typically these exercises are done for periods of time (for example, for thirty seconds).  For that reason these are commonly used as metabolic conditioning tools.   Heavy ropes make a great warm-up.  Due to their total body nature, they’ll warm up most of the muscles and joints, elevate heart rate,...

Flexibility Training: It’s Not What You Think

Blazevich et al in the most recent issue of the Journal of Applied Physiology have an article that examines what happens on several levels as a result of three weeks of flexibility training for the ankle joint.  In future years, we may be looking back at this study as one of those profound studies that change the way we think and practice.  I wanted to cover this study because it can be read on one level (here’s the study, here’s...

Strength May be Key to Determining PAP Effectiveness

Post-activation potentiation (PAP) is a topic that has been widely studied over the last five years.  The idea is that some type of heavy training can help to increase power production/speed.  Bellar et al look at PAP and its effect on weight throw performance in collegiate throwers.  The authors studied 17 throws, 9 male (squat 1-RM: 200% body weight, power clean 1-RM: 120% body weight) and 8 female (squat 1-RM: 150% bodyweight, power clean 1-RM: 100% bodyweight) throwers.  The athletes...