strength training

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The Power of “Don’t”: Coaching the Back Squat

Recently I had a post on social media about the importance of the squat for athletics. A friend that I really respect asked me about my thoughts on progressions for teaching the lift. I thought this would make a good post, but I’ll warn you in advance that I think we make this lift way too complicated.   First off, if you work in a one-on-one situation then you have the luxury of time. You also have the need to...

Strategies To Increase Strength

Strength is an important ability for athletes. Strength is necessary for sprinting, agility, throwing, hitting, kicking, and jumping.  It’s a frequent topic of mine with social media because a lot of people have been conditioned to think about according to the old periodization texts.   In those texts, you spend the bulk of the year developing hypertrophy and gradually transitioning to maximal strength training. You may spend 4-8 weeks of the year with maximal strength training, then you focus on...

Children Are Not Small Adults

Strength and conditioning professionals have been point out for years that children aren’t just smaller adults when it comes to training programs. In the latest issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Lloyd et al have an interesting study that compares younger subjects with older ones to see if training impacts different age groups differently.   The authors studied the effects of different types of training programs (plyometrics, strength training, and combined) on males that were pre-peak height...

How Important Is Between-Set Rest?

weightlifting

  We frequently prescribe workout programs that read something like this: 3 sets of 8 reps at 80%. This kind of workout program carries the assumption that we’re capable of maintaining that number of repetitions in each subsequent set. Senna et al, in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, have conducted a study to see if this is the case and to see if it is different when comparing multi-joint exercises and isolation exercises.   Their subjects had some...

Mobility and Bodyweight Exercises for Children with Down Syndrome

When I’m running fitness classes for children with Down Syndrome, I find that (like all kids) they don’t do very well with the concept of sets and repetitions. The fastest way to lose a group of kids in an exercise session is to tell them to do ten of something, have them rest, then repeat the whole thing. It’s boring for them. Having said that, developing gross motor skills (i.e. the child being able to control their body) in conjunction...