strength and conditioning

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Speed Training: How Many Drills Do You Really Need?

sprint

There are an almost unlimited number of drills for speed training. If you think about this, it makes sense. At the highest levels, track and field coaching often has to focus on the minutiae of athlete movements and many of these drills help to perfect an aspect of the skill. In addition, with the proliferation of sports performance facilities there is a need to attract paying clients via marketing and these drills help to sell services.   While there isn’t...

The Coach Has To Set The Tone

About a week ago I put out what I thought was a pretty straightforward tweet. The fact that it wasn’t received that way told me that this is something worth talking about in this blog. The tweet was: “As a coach do you create and drive the environment or do you react to it?”   I got some interesting responses to this tweet. Let me start this blog with the hard part. As a coach, I think it is critical...

Thoughts on Advanced Program Design

This is a post that deals with elite athletes, so it’s not going to be suitable for a lot of populations. In fact, some of what this post will cover is the opposite of what younger athletes (high school, first few years in college) need. Something to keep in mind when reading this.   A lot of my social media posts deal with the need for fundamentals. I spend a lot of time posting about the squat, picking things up...

Use The Kettlebell Floor Press For Upper Body Strength

There are a lot of exercises for upper body strength that we can use in an athletic setting. This week we’re going to introduce the kettlebell floor press as a great supplemental exercise for upper body strength.   To begin this exercise, sit on the floor. I like to have the athlete sit so that a kettlebell is just outside each hip. Grip the kettlebell handles and rest the kettlebells on the thighs. From here, lie back so that the...

Hard Work Is Not Going To Break You: A Rant

kettle bells

Hard work helps us to learn skills, to function in challenging circumstances, learn to resist fatigue, and teaches us how to play a sport with passion and intensity. Now, when I bring this up on social media someone always has to post something to the effect of “Yes, but we have to be careful with that message as too much hard work is bad.”   I have some concerns about these types of comments. My concerns center around the fact...