sprint

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Controversial Thoughts on Baseball and Speed Training

I’m not going to lie, I’m going to annoy some people with this post. This is a “food for thought” post. That means that I’m going to point some things out, but I’m not going to solve them with this post.   If you’ve been in the strength and conditioning field for more than a few months, you’ve heard of the principle of specificity. This principle says that you adapt to training according to the way in which you train....

Everything You Wanted To Know About Sprinting

There’s a great deal of focus on speed training and sports these days. Obviously it’s an important factor. Many people (and I was one of them) went to the track and field coaches to learn how to run fast and applied that knowledge to sports training. Over the last few years there’s also been an explosion of “experts” and “research” on this topic.   That said, often we’re trying to reinvent the wheel. I was reminded the other day of...

Accelerating And Top Speed: Differences

Sprint running has long been divided into three phases: acceleration, maximum velocity, and speed endurance. The first two have been considered important for the training of most athletes. In acceleration running we’re increasing our velocity. Initially this is done via frontside mechanics (i.e. our focus is on lifting our knee, landing on a flat foot, and pushing ourselves along). Maximum velocity running is where we are taller and are focused on frontside and backside running mechanics. With backside mechanics we’re...

Speed Training: Just Because Sprinters Do Something Doesn’t Mean You Should

Acceleration, the ability to increase velocity, is an important physical quality for sports performance. Most of us, when addressing the training of our athletes, make an understandable mistake when looking at this quality. We make the mistake of thinking that we are training track and field athletes.                   For a track and field athlete, a sprint is divided into three phases. Each phase has slightly different sprinting mechanics and each has slightly...

Training acceleration

For a sprint coach, a sprint is broken into several phases.  The start, acceleration, maximum velocity, and speed endurance.  The start includes reacting to the starting gun and getting out of the blocks explosively.  Acceleration is the process of increasing velocity.  Initially the athlete starts off low to the ground, is gradually increasing the size of his or her steps, and is transitioning from a period where frontside mechanics dominate (i.e. lifting the knee, foot is rigid, landing on the...