speed training

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Sprinters Have to be Able to Apply Force Quickly

Over the years I’ve seen a lot about training for sprinting on the internet. There are a lot of gurus and keyboard coaches. Slawinski et al, in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, had a really interesting article looking at about 30 years of elite sprinting.   In this study the authors analyzed the power, force, and velocity outputs of men and women 100 meter sprinters at the 1987, 1988, 1991, 1997, 1999, 2007, 2009, and 2011...

Resisted Sprints: It’s On The Legs!

Resisted sprinting has been around for awhile. The idea is to add resistance, to make the nervous system recruit more motor units during the sprinting motion, in the hopes that it will carry over to unressited sprinting. There are many ways to add resistance to athletes. Macadam et al, in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, look at an interesting way which is to add the resistance to the athlete’s legs.   The authors studied 19 amateur rugby players...

Soccer Speed: Small Sided Games May Not Be Enough

  Soccer is a sport that involves a lot of repeated sprints at various intensities during a match. With that in mind, coaches are very interested in the most effective ways to train soccer players. In the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Djaoui et al have a really interesting study that looks at the maximum speed demands of soccer players in both matches and in small sided games.   Small sided games are a conditioning tool used in several...

Accelerating And Top Speed: Differences

Sprint running has long been divided into three phases: acceleration, maximum velocity, and speed endurance. The first two have been considered important for the training of most athletes. In acceleration running we’re increasing our velocity. Initially this is done via frontside mechanics (i.e. our focus is on lifting our knee, landing on a flat foot, and pushing ourselves along). Maximum velocity running is where we are taller and are focused on frontside and backside running mechanics. With backside mechanics we’re...

Avoid Running Heel-To-Toe: A Glimpse Into Why

When we coach athletes to sprint, we want them to stay off their heels. In other words, we want them to avoid running with a heel-to-toe running pattern. Many distance coaches are trying to get their athletes to avoid that heel-to-toe running pattern as well. Instead, athletes are coached to run with the ball of their foot striking the ground using a pawing motion. In a 2015 issue of Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vannatta, and Kernozek have...