power clean

Tag

Olympic Lifts: Maybe We Don’t Need To Catch The Bar…

The Olympic lifts and their derivatives are widely performed in the strength and conditioning of athletes. They involve exerting force against the ground, rapid movements, high power outputs, and are total body efforts. However, they require a great deal of technique and take a long time to master. As a result, some coaches have moved to exercises like jump squats and partial movements like the pull that do not require a catching phase to reduce the technical demands.   One...

The Olympic Lifts: General or Specific Training Tool?

The Olympic lifts are extensively used in the conditioning of athletes.  They help to teach athletes how to apply force quickly.  For these lifts, this is done while standing up and involves most of the muscles of the body.  Having said this, these lifts have limitations in that their resemblance to sporting activities is occasionally oversold.  Moolyk et al, in the December issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, had a study comparing the lower extremities during the...

For Beginners Variety is Important

The power clean and its variations is a fundamental exercise in the strength and conditioning of athletes. The exercise develops most of the muscles of the body, is easy to learn, is performed standing, involves triple extension of the hips/knees/ankles, is believed to have a lot of transfer to the playing field, and enhances power. In two previous articles, Comfort et al (2011a, 2011b, 2012) demonstrated a number of factors about the power clean exercise (see http://wp.me/p1XfMm-6s , http://wp.me/pZfZK-6z ,...

Power Output and the Power Clean

The Olympic lifts and their variations are used extensively in the conditioning of athletes. This is because they are a ground-based, total-body exercise that develops power against resistance. While competitive weightlifters and other athletes both use these lifts for training, they approach these lifts differently. The competitive weightlifter is training to lift as much weight on these lifts as possible. Other athletes use these lifts to enhance their power production. With that in mind, it makes sense to focus the...

The Clean Pull is a Versatile Exercise

The Olympic lifts and their variations are used extensively in the strength and conditioning of athletes.  They are performed quickly (barbell velocity of 2-4 meters per second) and generate great power (depending upon the author they may require the athlete to generate between 20 and 50 watts/kilogram during the second pull).  The challenge is that the lifts are extremely technical.  With that in mind, some strength and conditioning coaches use a partial movement, called a pull, in place of cleans...