pitching

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The Legs And Pitching

I’ve seen a lot over the years about how to coach pitchers while they are on the mound. Depending upon their delivery style, pitchers will get their sign, move their feet under their hips and become motionless (this is called getting “set”), lift the stride knee into the air, take a large step towards home plate as they form an “L” with their arms, then lean forward as they release the ball. The stride and lean forward are critical to...

Pitching is Complicated

Every once in a while you read one of those profound studies that seemed to largely pass under the radar, the kind of study that challenges what we “know.” We know that baseball pitching puts a great deal of strain on the shoulder and that it puts the shoulder in an awkward position. We also know that our ability to sense the location of our arm in space (i.e. our shoulder proprioception) has a great deal to do with pitching...

Specificity: It’s Actually A Complicated Topic

agility training

The principle of specificity is an important one for the strength and conditioning coach, but it is also one that has limitations.  Traditionally specificity is defined as the body adapting to training according to how it is trained.  A very simplified example is that if you want to develop bigger biceps, you are probably going to have to perform exercises that train those muscles.  Relying on leg presses to increase your bicep size will probably be an exercise in frustration....

Pitchers Adapt To Pitching

At all levels, we’re concerned about the health of baseball pitchers.  Some studies show that more than 40% of MLB pitchers will be injured during a season.  Add to that concerns about overworking youth pitchers and you can see a need for knowledge on this topic.   In the current American Journal of Sports Medicine, Tyler et al examine this matter. This study was designed to look at the role of preseason shoulder strength and range of motion (ROM) on shoulder...

Rehab And Pitchers: What We “Know”

In a rehab program for baseball pitchers following shoulder or elbow injuries, there is typically a progression that involves flat ground throwing over increasing distances followed by mound throwing at different levels of effort. The idea is that the flat ground throwing is not as stressful to the elbow and shoulder. This is also the approach taken to get the arms of pitchers into shape after an off-season. In the May issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine, Slenker...