pap

Tag

Post-Activation Potentiation and the Nervous System: It’s Complicated

hexagonal bar

There has been a lot of contradictory research on post-activation potentiation (PAP) over the last five to ten years. Briefly, this is performing a heavy, slow strength training exercise prior to performing an explosive activity (like a jump, throw, or sprint). The idea is that the heavy strength training exercise will increase neuromuscular recruitment, leading to enhanced performance.   In the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, Thomas et al performed a study to assess whether this approach...

Power Development V: More Tools and Stratgies

hexagonal bar

In our last four posts ((http://www.cissik.com/blog/2017/01/power-development-part-i-foundations/ , http://www.cissik.com/blog/2017/02/power-development-part-ii-cautions/ , and http://www.cissik.com/blog/?p=1723&preview=true , http://www.cissik.com/blog/2017/03/power-development-part-iv-tools-and-strategies/ ) we covered background information behind training for power, cautions with it, principles behind program design, and some of the tools involved in power training. With this post we’ll cover more of the tools and strategies that are used in power training.   This post is going to cover: Power lifting Complex training Contrast training   Power lifting: The squat, bench press, and deadlift are used to...

Post-Activation Potentiation: Still No Smoking Gun

The concept of post-activation potentiation (PAP) has been around for a while and has had different labels over the decades. Briefly the idea is to combine a heavy movement with an explosive one. The heavy movement will cue the nervous system and this cueing will create a positive performance effect on the explosive movement. Over the last five to ten years there has been a great deal of research on this with decidedly mixed results. Whelan et al, in the...

Complex Training: Great Tool for the In-Season

In strength and conditioning, a complex is a combination of a slow, heavy strength exercise (like a squat) and a fast, explosive movement (like a vertical jump). In theory, the slow strength exercise cues the nervous system by maximally recruiting motor units and muscle fibers, then the fast, explosive movement takes advantage of that cuing. Sometimes this is referred to in the literature as potentiation, or post-activation potentiation (PAP). The idea being that this can eventually be carried over to...

Postactivation Poteniation and Shot Put Performance

shot putter

Larry Judge et al had a study in the March issue of Track and Cross Country Journal looking at post-activation potentiation (PAP) and shot put performance.  The authors studied high school-aged female shotputters (best throw of 12.2 meters, mean bench press 81% of bodyweight, mean squat 199% of bodyweight, and mean power clean 81% of bodyweight).  The idea behind the study was to examine the effects of throwing a heavier shot put prior to the competition shot.  In theory, the...