Olympic lifts

Tag

Power Training: Critical But Keep It In Perspective

For me, power is about the ability to express force quickly. I understand there are better definitions out there, but this is how I explain it to my athletes. Sometimes the purpose of a textbook writer is to classify things in new ways so that you purchase their book. If you consider power in light of that definition, then it is critical to the success of just about every type of athlete.   There are a lot of great gadgets...

The Big Five Is All You Need

Periodically I post on social media about the value of the big five movements in a strength and conditioning program. These five movements are the press, pull, row, squat, and Olympic lift. The gist of my posts is that you can’t go wrong if you base your athletic strength and conditioning programs around those five movements.   Now, when I post this I invariably get comments from people who are concerned about the lack of variety. Or the lack of...

Fundamental Lifts for Sports

When I started in the strength and conditioning field more than twenty years ago, the field was a lot different than today.  At the time, most strength and conditioning coaches had a background in powerlifting or Olympic lifting, sometimes both.  The majority of the job was performed in the weightroom with barbells and dumbbells.  Today, the tools that an entry level strength coach is expected to master is greatly expanded.  An entry level coach is expected to understand the Olympic...

Improving Postural Strength

  What I think of as postural strength is critical to the performance of many sports.  This may be a poor technical name, but to me it involves an ability to maintain posture while transferring force.  For example, when an athlete is sprinting we coach them to maintain their posture while driving the foot into the ground.  In track and field, jumpers lever off one leg which they attempt to accelerate their body through to perform horizontal and vertical jumps. ...

The Olympic Lifts: General or Specific Training Tool?

The Olympic lifts are extensively used in the conditioning of athletes.  They help to teach athletes how to apply force quickly.  For these lifts, this is done while standing up and involves most of the muscles of the body.  Having said this, these lifts have limitations in that their resemblance to sporting activities is occasionally oversold.  Moolyk et al, in the December issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, had a study comparing the lower extremities during the...