hypertrophy

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Strength and Hypertrophy: Evidence Based Or Arbitrary?

Almost every strength and conditioning textbook includes guidelines for volume/intensity of exercises when we are training for different goals. For example, the table below has some generic guidelines depending upon one’s goal:   Goal Sets Repetitions Intensity Maximal strength 3-5 1-8 80-100% Hypertrophy 3-5 8-12 70-80% Endurance 3-5 12+ <70%   We might quibble about adding/subtracting some repetitions or adjusting the intensity somewhat, but by and large most strength and conditioning professionals are going to accept the table above.  ...

Strength Training: Do Repetitions and Intensity Determine Gains?

bench press

For as long as I’ve been in this field, I’ve been taught that there are ideal ranges of volume and training intensity to accomplish different goals from strength training. For example, if you want hypertrophy then you should do sets of 8-12 repetitions at 70-85% of 1-RM.   In the Journal of Applied Physiology, Morton et al conducted a study that challenge that notion. The authors conducted a twelve week study to determine if volume/load and hormonal response to exercise...

The Big Five Is All You Need

Periodically I post on social media about the value of the big five movements in a strength and conditioning program. These five movements are the press, pull, row, squat, and Olympic lift. The gist of my posts is that you can’t go wrong if you base your athletic strength and conditioning programs around those five movements.   Now, when I post this I invariably get comments from people who are concerned about the lack of variety. Or the lack of...

Different Approaches To Training Impact The Muscles Differently

Interest in satellite cells have been around for awhile. Briefly, satellite cells are cells that are located between the outer and inner parts of the muscle fiber membrane. They are thought to be extremely important to hypertrophy, in fact they may be what provides the material to allow hypertrophy to occur. Previous research has shown that those individuals with the greatest increase in satellite cells as a result of training also make the greatest gains from training in terms of...

Muscles May Not Develop Uniformly

  In recent years there has been research establishing that large muscle groups experience hypertrophy in a nonuniform manner. In other words, the entire muscle does not grow equally as a result of strength training. Schoenfeld et al, in a 2015 study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, performed a study comparing the lying leg curl and the stiff legged deadlift’s muscle activation of the hamstrings based upon EMG data. The authors used resistance trained males and had...