deadlifts

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Are Hex Bar Deadlifts Better?

hexagonal bar

In recent years, the hexagonal deadlift (i.e. the trap bar) has gained in popularity with athletic strength and conditioning circles. The argument is that it puts the body in a safer position to perform the deadlift and may allow for more weight to be lifted. Some coaches swear by this exercise.   Like a lot of “new” things, there is resistance to this. In the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Lockie et al compared the conventional deadlift to the...

Hex Bar Deadlifts May Be Important For Athletes

hexagonal bar

The hex bar has been a popular tool for deadlifts for a number of years now. While the hex bar isn’t specific to what a powerlifter does in competition, it might have some advantages for an athlete. First, in theory it would not require as much technique as a straight bar deadlift. Second, it’s theorized to take some of the stress off the lower back. Third, it’s going to save an athlete’s shins as the bar isn’t going to be...

The Big Five Is All You Need

Periodically I post on social media about the value of the big five movements in a strength and conditioning program. These five movements are the press, pull, row, squat, and Olympic lift. The gist of my posts is that you can’t go wrong if you base your athletic strength and conditioning programs around those five movements.   Now, when I post this I invariably get comments from people who are concerned about the lack of variety. Or the lack of...

Do Bands Increase Power?

Lifters have been using bands and chains to help improve their bench press and squat for a long time now. These are used to help train the lifter to overcome sticking points and to overcome the inherent limitations of free weights (namely that the weight is easier to lift once the lifter gets past the sticking point). Some lifters use bands for deadlifts, but you don’t see this as often.   Bands and chains do not have a rich research...

A Fresh Look At Core Training: Why The Squat and Deadlift Are Important

Core training has received a great deal of attention over the last 15 years. It is presented as a very scientific, objective, and necessary way to approach training in order to improve performance, prevent lower back injuries, and treat lower back injuries. Much of this depends upon taking research with limited conclusions and applying that to a broader context. For example, two studies published in 1997 by Hodges and Richardson showed that the deep transversus abdominus was recruited first during...