Research

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Basketball: Not Every Position is Equal

basketball player

Basketball has three types of positions; guards, forwards, and centers. Guards tend to have better ball handling skills, are good passers, set up the offense, and can be good perimeter shooters. Forwards tend to be more versatile athletes and are able to get to the basket for lay ups and draw fouls. Centers are the big men and play low.   Puente et al had an interesting study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research to examine if...

Immune System and Exercise: Recovery and Diet Really Are Important

The immune system plays an interesting role in exercise, recovery, and adaptations from exercise. In an article I read years ago I had read that delayed onset muscle soreness (that soreness we get 24-48 hours post-exercise) tracks well with the timeline for the immune system response to that exercise session. In other words, we might become sore from exercise due to the fact that the immune system is attacking/repairing the damage that we did.   Peake et al had an...

Should Athletes Train Like Bodybuilders?

Bodybuilders and Olympic lifters have very different ways of approaching the volume of their training. Bodybuilders are used to thinking that they need to train to failure (or close to it) in order to maximize the gains in muscle mass from training. Olympic lifters are focused on the speed of their movements and on technique, so training to failure is a negative for them because of how that level of fatigue negatively impacts velocity and technique.   The question is,...

Sprinters Have to be Able to Apply Force Quickly

Over the years I’ve seen a lot about training for sprinting on the internet. There are a lot of gurus and keyboard coaches. Slawinski et al, in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, had a really interesting article looking at about 30 years of elite sprinting.   In this study the authors analyzed the power, force, and velocity outputs of men and women 100 meter sprinters at the 1987, 1988, 1991, 1997, 1999, 2007, 2009, and 2011...

Post-Activation Potentiation and the Nervous System: It’s Complicated

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There has been a lot of contradictory research on post-activation potentiation (PAP) over the last five to ten years. Briefly, this is performing a heavy, slow strength training exercise prior to performing an explosive activity (like a jump, throw, or sprint). The idea is that the heavy strength training exercise will increase neuromuscular recruitment, leading to enhanced performance.   In the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, Thomas et al performed a study to assess whether this approach...