Research

Category

Lifting Weights Really is Good for Your Brain…

People have said for awhile that exercise is good for the brain. That’s a pretty broad statement and is usually associated with anecdotal evidence. In the Journal of Applied Physiology, Church et al have an interesting study looking at strength training and something called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).   BDNF is a protein that supports the survival of neurons in the nervous system, as well as growth and differentiation of new neurons. It is important for memory, neurogenesis (growing new...

Supersets: For More Than Just Bodybuilders

bench press

Supersets have been around bodybuilding circles for a long time. Basically, supersets involve pairing two exercises and performing sets of them in an alternating fashion with little rest between them. For example, push-ups and bench press. Perform a set of push-ups then a set of bench press, continue alternating.   It can be done with similar muscle groups (the example above) or with opposing muscle groups. In that circumstance, one might superset dips and pull-ups.   The benefit of supersets...

Basketball: Not Every Position is Equal

basketball player

Basketball has three types of positions; guards, forwards, and centers. Guards tend to have better ball handling skills, are good passers, set up the offense, and can be good perimeter shooters. Forwards tend to be more versatile athletes and are able to get to the basket for lay ups and draw fouls. Centers are the big men and play low.   Puente et al had an interesting study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research to examine if...

Immune System and Exercise: Recovery and Diet Really Are Important

The immune system plays an interesting role in exercise, recovery, and adaptations from exercise. In an article I read years ago I had read that delayed onset muscle soreness (that soreness we get 24-48 hours post-exercise) tracks well with the timeline for the immune system response to that exercise session. In other words, we might become sore from exercise due to the fact that the immune system is attacking/repairing the damage that we did.   Peake et al had an...

Should Athletes Train Like Bodybuilders?

Bodybuilders and Olympic lifters have very different ways of approaching the volume of their training. Bodybuilders are used to thinking that they need to train to failure (or close to it) in order to maximize the gains in muscle mass from training. Olympic lifters are focused on the speed of their movements and on technique, so training to failure is a negative for them because of how that level of fatigue negatively impacts velocity and technique.   The question is,...