Baseball

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Train For What You Want

“Train for what you want”   This is one of the most fundamental principles in strength and conditioning and it’s the one that everyone overthinks and makes too complicated.  For most of us, this is really simple. If you want to improve on something then you have to practice the thing you want to improve on. Failing to do this means that you are relying on chance to make improvements, which is not a good idea for a competitive athlete...

Baseball Running is Not Running the 100 Meters

sliding into first base

I have taken some heat about speed and sports posts. The crux of these posts is that we have to stop thinking of training hundred meter sprinters when we are training athletes to run fast. While the techniques and training modes of hundred meter sprinters work great for them, focusing solely on these can ignore the needs of athletes.   With that in mind, today’s post is going to look at baseball – specifically the offensive side of baseball and...

Big Buildings Need Solid Foundations

The principle of progression says that fitness and sports need to be viewed as a series of steps, each of which builds on what came before. The idea here is that by following this principle, you have athletes with a solid base in terms of skills, athleticism, and fitness. Failing to follow this principle results in some serious gaps in fitness and skills and limits athletic development because of those gaps. It may also contribute to injuries due to weaknesses...

Controversial Thoughts on Baseball and Speed Training

I’m not going to lie, I’m going to annoy some people with this post. This is a “food for thought” post. That means that I’m going to point some things out, but I’m not going to solve them with this post.   If you’ve been in the strength and conditioning field for more than a few months, you’ve heard of the principle of specificity. This principle says that you adapt to training according to the way in which you train....

Agility Pitfalls

Pitfalls with Agility Training   Unlike when I started in the strength and conditioning profession, even an entry-level high school strength coach has to have a huge tool kit to address all the things we have to do today. Thirty years ago we were concerned with Olympic lifts, squats, deadlifts, bench presses, and some auxiliary exercises. Today, you have to know a little bit about everything.   Agility is important for athletes. As I’ve noted in another post, I see...